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Sangiliyan Thoppu

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Sangiliyan Thoppu

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During the existence of Nallur Rajadhani, last king of the kingdom of the people in the northern part of the country was Sankiliyan.But with the arrival of the Portuguese rule in Sri Lanka the fall of the kingdom was inevitable. This arch is found in the land where the earlier Tamil King Sangiliyan’s Palace stood. Now there is an entrance-arch, but this is said to be part of a later Dutch building. The Sangilean Thoopu is about 2.7 Km from Jaffna bus stand.

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King Sankili’s Statue 

Just a few metres away from the Nallur temple, on the Jaffna–Point Pedro Road, is a gold-plated statue of Jaffna’s last king. The old statue made of plaster of Paris was damaged during the war. The current statue was installed after the war ended in 2009. King Sankili II’s rule ended in 1619, when he was caught and executed by Portuguese invaders.
Palace Arch 

The royal palace that Sankili took over has long since been destroyed except for one solitary remnant – the arch to the Palace Gate. That arch alone is still standing – the sole testament to a bygone age, of palace intrigues and forgotten history.
The Queen’s Bathing Tank 
According to folklore, the many queens of the Jaffna kingdom and their attendants had a private bathing tank (no longer private) known as the Yamuna Aeri, located behind the palace. Local legend has it there was once a tunnel leading from the palace to the tank so that the ladies, who probably practised purdah could not be spotted by the common people.

Manthiri Manai / Minister’s Mansion 

Known in Tamil as the manthiri manai or minister’s mansion, this building is in better shape compared to the palace structure. A picturesque and old-worldly home, now overrun with unseemly graffiti, it seems increasingly out of place in urbanised Nallur.
A visible throwback to a bygone era in Jaffna’s history, it is also full of quiet—albeit filthy—nooks, that make it the venue of choice for young lovers. There are rickety steps leading to a possible upstairs, but they are best left unexplored given the general state of disrepair.
The history of the ancient kingdom of Jaffna is obviously deeper than these four pieces, but if you’re wondering around Nallur it’s a compact way to get a sense of what once was.

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